Wellesley Summer-2018 Photos-0157-1

Summer Term Fully Online Courses

SUMMER 2020 HAS ENDED.

Summer Term course offerings for 2021 are in the planning stage. Information on dates and schedules will be released later this year. Please check back and be on the lookout for an email with more details.

*INFORMATION BELOW REFLECTS 2020 OFFERINGS.*

June 1 - July 26, 2020


Overview

Wellesley College now offers select summer courses in the online environment, allowing students to experience the same course content taught on campus by Wellesley Faculty, but with the convenience of learning on your time -- from your preferred location. Wellesley College Summer Online courses are open to any undergraduate or adult learner who applies and is accepted through Wellesley Summer Term. All courses are co-ed and open to undergraduate students as well as rising juniors and seniors in high school.


What is the difference between online and remote courses?

Essentially, the difference is that our fully online courses have been designed to be taught online, and thus are more asynchronous in nature. Both have a synchronous component, but you can expect to spend less time on Zoom in a fully online course (1 hour per week scheduled around students’ schedules) and work through the course components online according to your schedule. This primarily asynchronous environment allows for learning on your schedule, reduced zoom fatigue as well as quality interaction with Wellesley faculty. Note: Synchronous times for fully online courses will not conflict with other Wellesley remote classes.*

 

The fully online courses are a bit longer, allowing for additional time to digest the content, and less contact time on a weekly basis. Wellesley fully online courses have been developed over a six month period with faculty and an instructional design team specifically geared towards students learning online. All of the content is posted into organized segments that include multiple instructional styles including short-form videos, threaded discussions, and other interactive elements. Finally, class sections are limited to 10 students allowing for small group discussions and assignments promoting student interaction.

 

Both formats offer equal Wellesley credit, meet listed distribution requirements, and qualify for other attributes of Wellesley College courses.


Cost: $2,925 per 1.0 unit


Benefits

  • Earn College Credit – Summer Online courses include the same curriculum found in our on campus courses, so students earn a letter grade and the same credits online as a full semester in the classroom.

  • Your Time, Your Course – Access the course and lecture material 24/7 to create a learning environment around your schedule each week without ever coming to campus. You'll participate in periodic live online classroom sessions throughout the semester to interact face to face with faculty and peers.*

  • 8-Week Semester – Our online summer courses are 8-weeks long. Wellesley Summer Online adheres to the same high level academic standards expected of a Wellesley College on campus course, and you will earn the same amount of credit.

  • Work Alongside Fellow Students – You won't be learning alone. Wellesley Summer Online courses are designed to be highly interactive, encourage group discussion, participation, and work in a collaborative environment.

  • Learn from Wellesley Faculty – All of our courses are designed and taught by accredited accomplished Wellesley College Faculty and are modeled after on campus courses. Faculty treat an online course as they do an on campus course, with regular feedback, office hours, and live sessions throughout the semester.


How To Apply

To apply, visiting students must complete and submit a "Summer Term" application.
Wellesley College students are required to register on-line for classes through the Workday portal in MyWellesley.


Courses

WRIT 231D Writing the Wave: Women Essayists in the 21st Century

Faculty:  Heather Bryant

This course will examine the recent, dramatic rise in the numbers of women writing and publishing the essay. This new wave of literary production, driven in part by the spirit of the #metoo movement, has inspired Cheryl Strayed to call it the essay’s “golden age.” Through studying the works of contemporary prose writers, we will explore the causes and effects of this phenomenon. We will also investigate how women are using and re-shaping the essay to foreground female experience and to confront difficult topics such as rape, harassment, abuse, and the silencing that so often surrounds those experiences. This rise in women’s voices is changing our literary and social landscape, and it is even shifting the form of the essay itself. Students will study this movement and contribute to it through their own writing. To add your name to the waitlist if the course is full, email hbryant@wellesley.edu.

CLCV 213D Engendering Ancient Greece: History of Sexuality and Gender

Faculty: Kate Gilhuly

This course will explore the various strategies the ancient Greeks used to represent gender relations. We will examine the ways that the categories of masculine and feminine were deployed to structure a multitude of oppositions that are not obviously inherent in the notion of gender, like the relationship between old and new, family and city, and the irrational and rational. Over the course of the semester, we will address the following questions: to what extent were the categories of masculinity and femininity structurally interdependent? How did gender intersect with sexual, political, and economic identities? Did the ancients make a distinction between sex and gender? To what extent have we inherited or do we replicate these ideas? Through close readings of ancient texts and consideration of the debates they have inspired, students will gain analytical tools for understanding the way power is shaped in and through their own lives and bodies.


Accessibility and Disability Services

Students can request accommodations due to a disability at https://shasta.accessiblelearning.com/wellesley Students will need to have a Wellesley College ID to access the system. There are also additional instructions on how to request accommodations at https://www.wellesley.edu/adr/for-students/requests. Inquiries can be sent to accessibility@Wellesley.edu

 

*Live class sessions will be established at the start of the semester based on best student availability. All live sessions will also be recorded and available after the live class.